Three Fatal Mistakes Recruiters Make When Looking For Software Developers

Software Developers are one of the most high demand candidates in recruitment right now, the average salary for a mid-level developer in some markets can get up to $100k/year mark, so if one of your clients come to you with a requirement for a Full Stack Engineer at $150k, It’ll be damn hard to say no to the hefty 20% of that!
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For this, many recruitment agencies find themselves diving into the Tech recruitment world not having a lot of knowledge & experience in it, which makes their lives a hell of a lot harder as they are going into uncharted territory.
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These are the top three mistakes recruiters make when looking for developers in Tech markets:
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1. Play the numbers game, go in with mindset of quantity not quality.
In the niche I specialise in (which is Sitecore CMS) there are some 4000 developers worldwide from what I could count being part of this community, say you can connect with all of these people, spin up a Boolean string, feed it into a LinkedIn automation tool & it’ll send 200 requests everyday to anyone who fits that description, at the same time you do a quick mine in your DB shortlist all of those who have the Sitecore or .NET keywords on their CV.
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10 days later you’ve got a about 10 CV’s, 9 of which are completely irrelevant and you’ll find out the hard way from the hiring manager. So your chances are quite slim at making a worthy placement if the client has put another agency with a little more experience in this market.
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Having tried to pitch 90% of the candidate pool & not getting results, this tells me it’s really not about the numbers, it’s about the quality of the approach. Improving your knowledge of the market & the mindset of the candidates within it will drastically improve your chances of getting better responses from them. Take it from someone who has been a candidate for the past 4 years 😉
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2. Do minimal to zero homework or education on the job order.
Soon as you get the job order you pick up the phone & start dialling, without asking any questions. Questions about the client, about the role, the project etc.. You’re thinking what’s important is to find the candidate & then I’ll obtain the info from the client later on.
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While you’re doing this, a specialist recruiters has gone in, asked the right questions, known exactly what they’re looking for, found the right fit AND presented a few profiles to the client, while you are still out there looking for a needle in a haystack but you don’t know what type of needle you’re looking for, because you don’t have a perfect candidate persona to work with.
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Do the homework, don’t learn the market on the job!
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3. Have no full picture of how to identify talent.
You don’t know the market, don’t have the full picture of how to identify the right candidates. And thus you don’t know how to pitch them, for example, people try to use the good old ways of mass mailing & cold calling, but the fact is, these guys do not want to talk to recruiters so that would be the worst way to approach them.
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There’s also the ability to verify one’s experience & if they truly know what they’re saying they know, that’s pretty much non-existent in this market.
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Add to that the classic JD pitch, pitching a Software developer with a JD that’s 3 pages long is one of the biggest turn offs. But what If I told you, I can pitch a role to a developer in 6 words or less? You might think I’m mad but that’s how I’ve done it. When you truly know the tech & the purpose behind it, you start to understand what matters most to candidates within this niche & how you can approach them.
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If you truly want to specialise in this niche & achieve in two months what would take you 3 to 5 years to learn on your own, get in touch with me today & let’s discuss how these insights and more can turn your consultants into dangerous recruiters in this market! http://www.cruits.uk

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